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Qutech may have solved the quantum computer’s nasty cable problem

Cables are getting in the way of building more powerful quantum computers. By creating qubits that work above absolute zero, Qutech and Intel raise hopes of integrating quantum hardware and their classic control electronics.

Headlines

Kendrion locks up 3T acquisition
Quantum computing unicorn considers European HQ near Imec
Semiconductor boom might turn to glut in 2023, says IDC
The Netherlands joins European chip collaboration
$12M seed round brings Dutch stealth startup Axelera AI to light
Loop Robots cleans up with a $2M seed investment
TU Delft and NFI investigate next-gen forensic photography
Pharrowtech field-tests mm-wave-based fixed wireless access
Funding for large-scale research infrastructure “insufficient”
Dutch TUs stumble further in 2022 THE rankings
Intel chief: fabs will bolster Europe’s high-tech ecosystem
ASML makes donation to new TUE quantum-photonics institute
Bruco opens first office abroad in Berlin

From Engineer of the Year to bankruptcy

Maja Rudinac did everything possible for her innovation, the Lea care robot. All lights were green, everyone loved the product and still, it didn’t make it.

In other news

Samsung and Xilinx partner on 5G chips (Venturebeat)
Operating Mars rovers from home (The Verge)
Google’s head of quantum hardware resigns (Wired)

AI engineering: making AI real

Building and deploying production-quality, industry-strength ML/DL systems require AI engineering as a discipline. These are the key research challenges that need to be addressed to allow more companies to transition from experimentation and prototyping to real-world deployment.